Author Topic: Post WWII Era Grumman F9F-6 Cougar  (Read 5230 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

lastvautour

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6205
Post WWII Era Grumman F9F-6 Cougar
« on: May 25, 2011, 07:46:03 AM »
The post WWII era had some magnificent aircraft to choose from. Jeff has chosen the Grumman  F9F-6 Cougar in 1/32 scale.

Jeff's efforts pay off extremely well in this superb rendition of the Cougar.
Jeff's words:
3/8" = 1' scale ("1/32 Scale") solid model made from aspen. Sealed with fiberglass resin. Control surface outlines engraved with a motor tool, panel lines made using a hot knife. Canopy cast in place from clear casting resin. Large markings made using frisket film masks; smaller markings are homemade decals. Maintenance stencils simulated using thinned white paint applied using a caligraphy pen nib. Base from pine, support made from clear acrylic plastic
« Last Edit: May 26, 2011, 10:02:22 AM by lastvautour »

JeffH

  • Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 57
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2011, 09:46:29 AM »
Thanks, Lou.

Attached are some Work-In-Progress pictures of the F9F-6 model.

The first photo shows the component parts; the model was made from aspen except for the intake trunks which were basswood.  The next photo shows the model held together with pins and slots.  I later replaced the wood support piece with clear acrylic.

The next photo shows the model after it was sealed, but before priming.  Lots of filler on this one!  The pink filler is from catalyst-activated auto body filler ("Bondo" in the U.S.).  Latex based wood filler was also used.  I figured the Bondo would be a little stronger/crack resistant than the latex filler.

After priming, I decided to try making a clear canopy.  The next photo shows the original canopy ground off (after I first made a couple of molds from Durhams Water Putty - an automotive paste wax was first applied to the original canopy area to ease removal of the dried mold).  I painted the exposed fuselage black and added a plastic simulated ejection seat/headrest.  I drilled a large hole for pouring clear resin and some smaller air holes through the fuselage.  Next, I attached the mold to the model surface (note the registration marks added to ensure alignment) and poured the casting resin through the the bottom of the fuselage.  The next photo shows the mess that left; I should have put masking tape around the holes to catch the spilled resin.

This method of creating a clear cockpit wasn't a complete success.  When I removed the mold I discovered a multitude of bubbles where the resin was in contact with the model surface (the bubbles are visible in the photos of the completed model).  Next time, I'll try brushing some resin on the model surface before adding the mold and pouring in the resin.

The next photos show the detail parts.  The nose wheel fork was made from a aluminum stock; the soft metal is easy to shape with files and sanding sticks.  I started with a rectangular piece, sawed a slot for the wheel, then filed to shape.  The upper portion was filed to a round cross section to fit into a brass tube soldered to the brass landing gear strut, addtional details were made from styrene.  The wheels were made from laminated disks punched from styrene sheet (from a For Sale sign); the outer most laminations had an additional hole punched in the center to define the wheel/tire separation.  Speed brakes are cut from pieces of plastic venetian blind material with holes drilled.

Panel line detail was added using a hot knife with a popsicle stick for a straight edge.  To keep the straight edge from sliding around, I attached 400 grit sandpaper to it using double sided tape.  The markings were painted on using masks cut from frisket film.

Thanks for looking,

Jeff




« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 04:22:25 PM by JeffH »

Mark Braunlich

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 536
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2011, 10:37:10 AM »
Very impressive Jeff.  I like this model a lot.

Mark

dave_t

  • Guest
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2011, 11:51:04 AM »
I like how it looks in photo 2, before the final shaping. That and Barry's Heath Parasol make me want to try more plain wood models.

I did wonder about the clear canopy on the finished model. It almost looked like there was aluminum foil inside.

Ken Pugh

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 411
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 12:54:38 PM »
Nice looking model well displayed.  Well done.

Ken Pugh

Balsabasher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1821
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2011, 01:59:41 PM »
An outstanding and highly refined solid model,very interesting techniques that have brought forth some excellent results,well done Jeff.
Barry.

cliff strachan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 796
    • Cliff
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2011, 02:20:32 PM »
A very wonderful model - whether Solid Scale Scratchbuilt or otherwise. In a class by itself and a challenge to all. Jeff, if possible, you have outdone all your previous presentations. And thanks for the detailed description of your methods.
Cliff.

JeffH

  • Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 57
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2011, 04:26:17 PM »
Thanks for your comments, everybody.

I had fun building that model and it is now one of my favorites!  I'm you like it too.


Jeff

Balsabasher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1821
Re: Post WWII Era
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2011, 04:09:03 AM »
Jeff your accessories look most interesting,are they resin items that you have made from moulds ?
Barry.

JeffH

  • Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 57
Re: Post WWII Era Grumman F9F-6 Cougar
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2011, 10:41:56 AM »
Barry,

This model doesn't contain any cast resin parts, although the wheels may have lent themselves to that procedure.  

I made the wheels by laminating punched styrene disks and rounding off the corners with a sanding stick.  The rest of the parts are mostly brass rod (for the struts and tail hook) with styrene details and brass sheet for the landing gear doors.  Landing gear retraction jacks are from round toothpicks and paperclip wire.

Thanks for your interest,

Jeff
« Last Edit: June 02, 2011, 10:45:35 AM by JeffH »