Author Topic: Simulated Fabric Covering  (Read 1776 times)

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JeffH

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Simulated Fabric Covering
« on: February 09, 2009, 11:23:29 AM »
I've taken some photos to illustrate the method I use to simulate fabric covering on solid airplane models.  The subject is a 1:32 Cessna T-50.
After the model has been sealed and primed, I mark the rib and stringer locations in pencil.  Next strips of .010" styrene are attached using Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) solvent to melt the plastic strips onto the model's surface.  An individual strip is held in position and a small quantity of MEK brushed on; the MEK dissolves the styrene enough to make it adhere to the surface.  The strips were notched at the control surface separations.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2009, 11:40:03 AM by JeffH »

JeffH

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Re: Simulated Fabric Covering
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2009, 11:26:24 AM »
After all the styrene strips have been applied, I next mix up a concoction of Rust Oleum "Rusty Metal Primer"-- a thick oil based primer.  To thicken it further, I add some ordinary corn starch.  To speed up the drying time, I also add a few drops of Japan Dryer.  This mix is then applied over the styrene strips until they are completely covered.  Several applications are usually necessary.
After the Rust Oleum has thoroughly dried, the model is then wet sanded using rolled up strips of Wet or Dry sandpaper.  Most of the primer between the ribs is sanded away in the process leaving behind little hills and valleys.  The photo was taken after the sanding process was complete.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2009, 11:39:04 AM by JeffH »

cliff strachan

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Re: Simulated Fabric Covering
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2009, 11:29:15 AM »
Thanks Jeff for such a detailed and immediate response.

Cliff.

JeffH

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Re: Simulated Fabric Covering
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2009, 11:30:34 AM »
After the model has been sanded smooth, gray rattle-can laquer primer is applied; the attached photo was taken at this stage.  The styrene strips have been blended into the model's surface to create the impression of underlying ribs and stringers.