Author Topic: P-51D Mustang  (Read 5553 times)

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Model Maker

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Re: P-51D
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2015, 08:01:39 PM »
Completed chiseling the mortise in the fuselage and tenon on the wing.

First picture shows the fuselage clamped in my carving fixture with the mortise chiseled out. The 1/32 scale allows me to utilize a couple of vices to clamp the fuselage for chiseling,  carving and sanding. The vices were purchased from Busy Bee, but are no doubt available at many woodworking supply shops. They are relatively cheap (around $15.00 cdn. each) when on sale. I mounted these to a built up base consisting of a 2x8 and two 2x6's. The base is in turn clamped into a Black & Decker Workmate.

The second picture shows the tenon carved at the end of the wing. The tenon has to be chiseled at a slight angle to ensure the wing dihedral is correct. The third picture is of the wing attached to the fuselage. Final fitting and gluing of the wing will be performed after the fuselage is rough shaped

« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 08:14:28 PM by Model Maker »

Model Maker

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2015, 08:11:14 PM »
First picture is the clamping jig I use for chiseling, carving and sanding. It works well for 1/32 scale planes, but not sure it would be appropriate for some of the smaller scales. If folks are interested I can put together a set of plans and place them in the tools posting.

Second picture is of a 1/4" chisel which has been narrowed at the end to facilitate chiseling the mortise. The end was narrowed using a disk sander and frequent dipping into water to keep the steel cool. I find this approach provides a more comfortable handle than some of the smaller carving chisels. It's also easier to sharpen as there is some width in the shank.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 08:27:36 PM by Model Maker »

buccfan

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2015, 01:41:20 AM »
Nice work on the mortise and tenon Ken, thanks for posting the pictures of your tooling ideas, the clamping jig certainly looks useful. Regards Paul J.

lastvautour

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2015, 10:11:36 AM »
I never thought of clamping the end piece for fuselage carving. I think Garet did something similar for holding smaller parts and leaving a tang to hold on to. Thanks for all the great ideas.

Ken, please tell about yourself  at http://smm.solidmodelmemories.net/SMF/index.php?topic=1341.0

Lou

Model Maker

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2015, 04:42:22 PM »
Lou;

I am using the same approach as Garet. When the fuselage is initially cut out, I leave a tang approximately 3" long  and having a decent cross section of approximately 1-1/4" x 1-1/4" starting from the propeller hub. This provides the clamping area. Once the carving and sanding are complete, I cut off the tang and then attach the propeller hub. Alternately if folks wish to carve the propeller hub as an integral part of the fuselage, most of the hub shaping can be performed by removing material from the tang. At some point, the tank will need to be cut  at the tip if the propeller hub and the final hub shaping and sanding performed. Clamping the tang allows me to have better chisel and file control as both hands are available and the model strongly supported the use of my hands. Hopefully also providing less chance of a chisel nicking or cutting me.

If folks are looking for some ideas, take a look at the "Busy Bee Tools" web site. The vice which I used is the 3" drill press vice. The drill press vise has low jaws and allows the bottom of the tang to sit on metal. When the hold down clamp pushes down and the vice jaws are closed, there is absolutely no movement of the carving as the wooden tang is positively restrained vertically and horizontally. I see the drill press vice is on sale for $11.50. The hold down clamp is the 3" Jorgensen which is listed to $19.99 but which I also bought on sale. There are lots of options available and all are commodities so should be readily available through any local supply company. The acme threads on the vice and hold down clamp make rotating the fuselage simply and quick.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2015, 12:25:53 PM by Model Maker »

Peter

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2015, 09:47:01 PM »
Hi Ken,

I looked up Busy Bee tools they're about 20 minutes from my house! I've never heard of of them.

Thanks

Peter

lastvautour

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2015, 03:55:25 AM »
I have a drill press vice but never thought of using it in this fashion. Thanks.

Lou

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2015, 06:47:51 PM »
Sorry folks - am a little tardy on my replies.

Paul - Thanks for the feedback on the mortise and tenon. I'll try to post an illustration on the clamping jig later in the week. I won't bother dimensioning it, since the hole dimensions are specific to each manufacturer. But the general assembly may provide folks with a starting point.

Peter - Glad you were able to find a Busy Bee nearby. If you are thinking of making some of the sanding blocks, I purchased some of their 12" velcro backed sanding disks and cut them into strips to fit the blocks. There's a little bit of wastage, due to the circular shape, but the paper backing is very thick and rigid. I find the 80 and 120 grits quickly smooth the surface.

Lou - Glad I was able to provide you with another use for the drill press vice.

Model Maker

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2015, 06:50:07 PM »
Rough shaping of stabilizers and wings completed. Fuselage is clamped in carving jig and reading for shaping. Now the fun begins as everything will start to take shape together :)

Last parts to make are the propeller hub and propeller blades. I'll start these once the everything else is carved and assembled.

Model Maker

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Re: P51-D Mustang
« Reply #24 on: May 10, 2015, 12:15:50 PM »
Completed rough shaping of fuselage.

First picture shows the two fuselages shaped and ready for assembly with wings and stabilizers. Tangs are still intact to allow final blending and sanding of assembly in clamping jig. Material left on side of fuselage to allow shaping of fillet after wings have been glued in place.

Second picture shows tools used in rough shaping. For the Spitfires I primarily used a chisel to shape the fuselage. For this build, I instead opted to try primary shaping using files. The larger 12" file has a good bite. Not as rough as a rasp, but it quickly removes material. Final shaping performed with the finer 8" and 6" files. I used the chisel for some corner work around the canopy and removing material around the wing fillet. The files were great for  shaping the contours of the fuselage as I didn't have to worry about grain direction which can be an issue when chiseling.

The 6" digital caliper is a wonderful tool for comparing carving and 3 view dimensions. Although the really accurate calipers can be expensive. Some of the in-house brands of the big box stores can be purchased for around $20 to $25 cdn. when they go on sale. If you don't have one, maybe a possible gift for Father's Day or another special occasion.

Next step; onto assembly :)
« Last Edit: May 10, 2015, 12:24:58 PM by Model Maker »

lastvautour

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2015, 01:09:26 PM »
I have used some rasps for some bigger projects. You seem to have a great knack for rough carving with them. Looking forward to more.

Lou

Model Maker

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #26 on: May 10, 2015, 08:30:53 PM »
Lou:

I started with the larger file. Then progressed to the mid size  and finished with the small file. Each smaller file size has a finer tooth patter. After shaping with the small file I performed a light sanding with 120 grit sand paper. The 6" file doesn't leave very many "teeth marks" so it didn't take a great deal of sanding to eliminate them.

buccfan

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2015, 01:51:45 AM »
Great progress Ken, leaving the tang on is a great idea, avoids leaving additional marks to be sanded out while trying to hold an irregular shape. Regards Paul J.

Biggles

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2015, 06:23:01 PM »
Ken I use files for everything!
Rough rasp first then smaller rasp, fine file then sand paper. I only use a knife for getting the shape of cock pits right.
Biggles
John 15:13

Model Maker

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Re: P-51D Mustang
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2015, 06:49:12 PM »
Started back into the build.

First picture shows wings and fuselage in wing clamping just. Prior to gluing the stabilizers and wings to the fuselage, the control surface outlines were scribed into the wings and stabilizers. It's much easier to perform the initial scribing with the components flat on the workbench. Two holes were also drilled in bottom of fuselage for eventual mounting on display stand. Three (3) holes drilled in each wing for future gun mounts. Holes will need to be tweaked to ensure they are all in line.

Second picture shows tools used for measuring and scribing the control surface outlines. I've found the backside of a hacksaw blade makes a great straight line surface to use as a guide for scribing. I use a couple of tools for scribing in the direction of the grain. A homemade scriber using a nail glued into a handle and a dental tool. Still have to perform some shaping of the dental tool. For scribing across the grain, a sharp knife seems to work best. After all surfaces have been scribed, I take the back of the knife and run it along all scribes to act as a burnisher. I'll have to re-scribe when the primer has had a final sanding. But at least I will have some initial grooves to follow. The steel bar on the right is the template used for drilling the two holes in the fuselage for the future mount. It's quite long which faciltates ensuring the holes are drill correctly on the centre line.

Third picture shows the wing clamping jig on it's own. It provides lateral clamping force to facilitate the gluing process to attache the wins to the fuselage. If folks are interested, I can place a copy of the plans in the tool posting section.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2015, 06:56:35 PM by Model Maker »