Author Topic: Blohm & Voss BV141  (Read 832 times)

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Balsabasher

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Blohm & Voss BV141
« on: December 17, 2013, 02:28:04 PM »
Here is a little quick build that I have put together,its the Blohm und Voss BV141 a most unusual aircraft from WW2.
The finish was experimental and first it was primed in watered down PVA glue and left to dry on the radiator,after the grain fuzzed up it was sanded down and given a further two coats of the PVA solution,then the finish was applied with a brush and artists acrylic paints pre mixed to the required shades,brush clean up with water.

The Blohm & Voss BV 141 was a World War II German tactical reconnaissance aircraft. It is notable for its uncommon structural asymmetry. Although the Blohm & Voss BV 141 performed well, it was never ordered into full scale production, for reasons that included the unavailability of the preferred engine and competition from another tactical reconnaissance aircraft, the Focke-Wulf Fw 189.

The perspex-glazed crew gondola on the starboard side strongly resembled that found on the Fw 189, and housed the pilot, observer and rear gunner, while the fuselage on the port side led smoothly from the BMW 132N[1][a] radial engine to a tail unit.
At first glance, the placement of weight would have induced tendency to roll, but the weight was evenly supported by lift from the wings.
In terms of thrust vs drag asymmetry, the countering of induced yaw was a more complicated matter. At low airspeed, it was calculated to be mostly alleviated because of a phenomenon known as P-factor, while at normal airspeed it proved to be easily controlled with trimming.
The tailplane was symmetrical at first, but in the 141B it became asymmetrical – starboard tailplane virtually removed – to improve the rear gunner's field of view and fire.




Will

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Re: Blohm & Voss BV141
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2013, 02:53:08 PM »
Nice model Barry.  Is it 1/72?
Do you add talc to the watered down pva.  I guess you have to wait a while to rub down, compared to cellulose sanding sealer!
Will

Balsabasher

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Re: Blohm & Voss BV141
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2013, 03:06:39 PM »
Yes Will it was built from the 1=72nd scale plan in the 'Aircraft of the Fighting powers' seven volume series,no need to add any talc as the PVA contains miniscule polyvinyl acetate micro balloons which when dry are rubbed down with medium flourpaper,once those balloons break down in the sanding the subsequent coats soak into them building up gradually,the process works well.

Drying can be accelerated with an heat gun played from a few feet or in an airing cupboard,it normally goes off in around an hour,the waterproof variety of PVA is the best one to use.

There is another technique which involved stretching cling film across a wetted PVA surface say a wing,you brush on the adhesive thinned down 50/50 and pull the cling film across the wing wrapping it around the edges until it dries,you have to do a surface at a time but the finish is like glass once mastered.

Some say why use PVA ? well the answer is simple,if you live in a sensitive flat or similar where you do your model making then any cellulose is out of the question,the use of these odourless solutions is the answer.

Barry.

lastvautour

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Re: Blohm & Voss BV141
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2013, 01:58:27 PM »
Excellent Barry. You never cease to amaze.

Lou