Author Topic: Spider Jim's Strombecker SBC-4 Spotter Kit  (Read 2518 times)

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spider web

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Spider Jim's Strombecker SBC-4 Spotter Kit
« on: November 28, 2008, 03:42:14 PM »
This morning I cut out the blanks for two SBC-4 solid models out of chunk of bass wood that was hiding in the shop.

Using the computer, I downloaded the prints from the members file, ran a print and enlarged it on my scanner so that the fuselage is now 8" long.
The model is not too large nor not too small to handle given my two big thumbs.

Fascinating to me is that I haven't lost the awe that comes with taking a block of wood and turning it into something not only beautiful but an artifact of history. 

Now that I have all the goodies, tool wise, like the HAWK 220 scrollsaw, FLEX-CUT carvers, several Dremel Tools, a Foredom power carver, power sanders and other items greatly speeds up the fun.  My wife bought me a safety carving glove which saved me many a nick.   

Before I forget, how do you seal/finish your carving before application of the final paint ?


lastvautour

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Re: Strombecker SBC-4 Spotter Kit
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2008, 04:22:28 AM »
Jim check out the technique section for tips on sealing and finishing. There is no one answer to your question. I just keep trying different approaches until the model is finished to MY satisfaction.

spider web

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Re: Strombecker SBC-4 Spotter Kit
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2008, 06:32:16 AM »
Calling me "Spider Jim" is just fine !
I'm truly reinvigorated and delighted in connecting up with some like minded folks who share some of the same interests and also survived some of life's challenges !

I like sharing some of my anecdotal tales not as a braggart but hoping that others will do so also. The braggarts normally run for political office !
"Look at what I did or am going to do for you !" is their mantra.

There is enough evil in the world to go around !

As a kid growing up I myself got deservidly kicked in the butt when I didn't pay attention or did the normal dumb kid stuff !  I was fortunate to have been trained by several tough as nails, demanding craftsman that at heart were kind and caring.   At age thirteen, the very first tool I was trained to use and respect was a file by a Swedish trained tool and die maker.  Ever make a "Jo Block ?"

Do you think that a separate heading for sharing of anecdotal tales would work ?


lastvautour

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Re: Strombecker SBC-4 Spotter Kit
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2008, 08:12:13 AM »
Spider Jim, I am not familiar with the term Jo Block.  There is now section for reminiscing.

Lou

spider web

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Re: Strombecker SBC-4 Spotter Kit
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2009, 10:43:02 AM »
Sorry not to have replied earlier but have been side tracked with some family matters.
A Jo Block is a gauge block used to calibrate a machine or job set up.
If you go to Wikipedia and plug in Johansson Block, a whole page comes up with a picture of a complete set and descriptions of the various applications.
The blocks were reserved for high precision machining such as tool and die making.    This was before the age of computers and other modern machine control devices.   Normally the blocks were always stored in a controlled environment to maintain their tolerances.
The man that trained me was an apprentice boy at Johannson's school in Sweden.
Under the apprentice system a boy would be required to make his own tools that would last the rest of his life.  Just like the cabinet or furniture maker,  each tool you made was based on the knowledge you gained and the skills you perfected.
The first thing you learned in a tool and die shop was how to use a file, lap and polish metal.
I started working after school in a tool and die shop when I was thirteen. By the time I was eighteen and graduated from high school I was so skilled at using all the measuring devices such as calipers along with the sharpening of tools that Piasecki hired me and put me to work as a bench mechanic.   Started out at a $1.18/hr.  I made parts for the HUP, H-16 and H-21 at the time.
They had me fininshing the rotor hubs and "Jesus" nut !